Share on

 STOCKHOLM - Skyline International has discovered the Israeli government is helping suppress dissent and freedom of opinion in Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Bahrain. It is providing those countries with a technology hacking mobile phones and spying on their users. 

The Stockholm-based international foundation  also states that the Israeli company (NSO Group Technologies) has committed horrific human rights violations. This company has supported many repressive governments with programs of censorship to purse political and human rights activists and opponents.

According to the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, Israel has allowed the NSO to sell spying technology on mobile phones to Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Bahrain to pursue their opponents in recent years.

Haaretz also indicates that the NSO sold its "Pegasus" spy program for hundreds of millions of dollars to track the countries above' opponents. These deals were accomplished through formal mediation and encouragement from the Israeli government.

Skyline International emphasizes that states are obliged to respect human rights in the context of companies' activities by setting up regulatory rules. Also, those companies must respect human rights in all their activities, especially human rights related to privacy issues.

NSO company is one of the most active Israeli companies in the Gulf states. "Pegasus 3" programs, which were developed by law enforcement agencies, can hack phones, copy their contents and sometimes use them remotely for recording and filming.

The company NSO focuses its business on electronic intelligence, and it was founded in 2010. According to the firm's board of directors, it provides "technological support" to foreign governments to help them "fight terrorism and crime. 

On the other hand, the Electronic Front Foundation, a digital rights group, and the Citizen Lab Foundation have accused the Israeli company of developing programs used in hacking and spying on human rights activists and journalists in many countries.

Previously, a series of lawsuits were filed against NSO as it participated in numerous human rights violations. For example Omar Abdel Aziz, a Canadian with Saudi origins, filed a lawsuit in Israel against the company. He accused it of providing the Saudi government with a surveillance program to spy on him and his friends, including the Saudi journalist "Jamal Khashoggi" who was killed brutally in his country's consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, early October 2018.

In October 2019, Amnesty International revealed that two prominent human rights defenders in Morocco have been targeted using Pegasus program who are Maati Monjib, an academic and human rights activist, and Abdessadak El Bouchattaoui, a human rights lawyer.

Previous research also revealed that Pegasus was used to target at least 24 human rights defenders, journalists and parliamentarians in Mexico. It was also used against the Saudi activists, Yahya Al-Asiri and Ghanem Al-Masaryer, and the Emirati  Activist Ahmed Mansour. It has also been used to spy on Catalonian politicians in Spain, Ernest Maragall, exconseller of Catalonia, and the President of Catalonia, Roger Torrent

Facebook has also sued NSO after it exploited a security vulnerability in the WhatsApp application to target at least 100 human rights defenders.

Skyline affirms that using this type of technology is limited to sovereign countries in order to combat organized crime and terrorism. The cooperation of Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain with NSO calls into question the widespread involvement in targeting opponents and bloggers using technology.

The human rights foundation "Skyline" calls on revoking the export license of NSO firm if its programs are proved to be used in attacking opponents, bloggers and activists  and violating the rights of privacy and freedom of expression and opinion.

STOCKHOLM - Skyline International states that the Israeli government is  suppressing dissent and freedom of opinion in Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain, by providing those countries with a technology hacking mobile  phones and spying on its users.

The Stockholm-based international foundation  also states that the Israeli company (NSO Group Technologies)  have committed horrific human rights violations. This company has supported many repressive governments with programs of censorship to purse political and human rights activists and opponents.

In this regard, Skyline adds that the Hebrew newspaper (Haaretz) today, Sunday, reveals that Israel has allowed NSO to sell technologies spying on mobile phones to Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain to pursue their opponents in recent years.

Haaretz  also indicates that NSO sold its "Pegasus" spy program for hundreds of millions of dollars to track opponents of the aforementioned countries. This was done through official mediation and encouragement from the Israeli government.

Skyline International emphasizes that states are obliged to respect human rights in the context of companies' activities by setting up regulatory rules. Also, those companies must respect human rights in all their activities, especially human rights related to privacy issues.

NSO company is one of the most active Israeli companies in the Gulf states. "Pegasus 3" programs, which were developed by law enforcement agencies, can hack phones, copy their contents and sometimes use them remotely for recording and filming.

NSO, which focuses on electronic intelligence, was founded in 2010. It provides "technological support" to the world's governments in order to help them "fight terrorism and crime, according to the firm's board of directors

On the other hand, the Electronic Front Foundation, a digital rights group, and the Citizen Lab Foundation have accused the Israeli company of developing programs used in hacking and spying on human rights activists and journalists in many countries.

Previously, a series of lawsuits were filed against NSO as it participated in numerous human rights violations. For example Omar Abdel Aziz, a Canadian with Saudi origins, filed a lawsuit in Israel against the company. He accused it of providing the Saudi government with a surveillance program to spy on him and his friends, including the Saudi journalist "Jamal Khashoggi" who was killed brutally in his country's consulate in Istanbul, Turkey, early October 2018.

In October 2019, Amnesty International revealed that two prominent human rights defenders in Morocco have been targeted using Pegasus program who are Maati Monjib, an academic and human rights activist, and Abdessadak El Bouchattaoui, a human rights lawyer.

Previous research also revealed that Pegasus was used to target at least 24 human rights defenders, journalists and parliamentarians in Mexico. It was also used against the Saudi activists, Yahya Al-Asiri and Ghanem Al-Masaryer, and the Emirati  Activist Ahmed Mansour.

Facebook has also sued NSO after it exploited a security vulnerability in the WhatsApp application to target at least 100 human rights defenders.

Skyline affirms that using this type of technology is limited to sovereign countries in order to combat organized crime and terrorism. The cooperation of Saudi Arabia, the UAE and Bahrain with NSO calls into question the widespread involvement in targeting opponents and bloggers using technology.

The human rights foundation "Skyline" calls on revoking the export license of NSO firm if its programs are proved to be used in attacking opponents, bloggers and activists  and violating the rights of privacy and freedom of expression and opinion.